globe
This list relates to the 2017-18 which ended on 18/08/2018
This list has a newer version. Click here to view
This list has been archived
  1. Week 1: Introductory Reading (no tutorials) 22 items
    Before you begin reading for the tutorial in week 2, you should make sure you know the following things.
    1. Geography of Italy and the Mediterranean World 2 items
      You should be able to locate Rome, Carthage and the major Hellenistic centres on a map. It helps to have an idea of the relief too, and the main communication routes.
      1. Atlas of classical history - Richard J. A. Talbert 1985

        Book 

      2. Ancient history atlas - Michael Grant, Arthur Banks 1971

        Book 

    2. Sources for Roman History 1 item
      What are the main sources? When did they write? What kind of writers are they? The Oxford Classical Dictionary (OCD, 3rd edition) has excellent short biographies.
      1. The Oxford classical dictionary - Simon Hornblower, Antony Spawforth 2003

        Book  Available in the Classics Library and as an e-book. A later print edition is available in the Classics Library and the Main Library at PA31.O8G12.

    3. Narrative of Republican Roman History 3 items
      The creation of the Republic, the wars with Carthage, the conquest of the East, the transformation of Italy, the popularis crisis, the beginning of the cycle of civil wars, the rhythm of imperialism, how Augustus stops all this. Most text books, and the Cambridge Ancient History (CAH, 2nd edition) have timelines.
      1. The Cambridge ancient history: Vol 9: The last age of the Roman republic, 146-43 B.C. - J. A. Crook, Andrew Lintott, Elizabeth Rawson 1994

        Book  Available in the Library and as an e-book.

      2. The Cambridge ancient history: Vol.10: The Augustan Empire, 43 B.C.-A.D. 69 - Alan K. Bowman, Edward Champlin, Andrew Lintott 1996

        Book  Available in the Library and as an e-book.

    4. Key Institutions of the City of Rome 1 item
      Including the senate, the magistrates, the equestrian order, the assemblies, the law courts, the priestly colleges
      1. The Oxford Classical Dictionary - Simon Hornblower, Antony Spawforth 2003

        Book  Available in the Classics Library and as an ebook. A later edition is available in the Classics Library and Main Library at PA31.O8G12.

    5. Topology of the City of Rome 1 item
      Locate the Capitol and the Forum, the seven hills and the main routes in and out of the city. Web sites can give a lot of help here.
    6. Biographies 5 items
      If you have a good grasp on other general issues, you might look up Plutarch's Lives of the Gracchi, Marius, Sulla, Pompey, Cicero and Caesar.
    7. Background Reading 9 items
      For a narrative account of the Republican period, read one of the following:
      1. The Roman Republic - Michael Crawford 1992

        Book  One of the best general discussions of the period.

      2. A history of Rome (4th ed.) - Marcel Le Glay, Jean-Louis Voisin, Yann Le Bohec 2009

        Book  Better suited to newcomers to Roman history; note that this textbook covers the Roman Empire and is suggested reading for the second-year module AN2002: The Roman Empire.

      3. From the Gracchi to Nero: a history of Rome 133 B.C. to A.D. 68 - H. H. Scullard 1988

        Book  Only if you are familiar with the period.

      4. A Short Guide to Roman Society 1 item
        1. Rome in the late Republic: problems and interpretations - Mary Beard, Michael Crawford 1999

          Book  For a short guide to Roman society.

      5. Other accessible introductions to Roman history and historians 5 items
        1. A companion to the Roman Republic - Nathan Stewart Rosenstein, Robert Morstein-Marx 2006

          Book  Available in the Library and as an e-book.

        2. The Cambridge companion to the Roman historians - Andrew Feldherr 2009

          Book  Available in the Classics Library and as an e-book.

  2. Week 2: The Roman Household 24 items
    1. This week's tutorial aims to give insights into Romans' most immediate environment, the household. Also, we will be considering categories of Romans that do not figure prominently in our sources: women, children and slaves. First, read the sources in the Source Booklet. It is especially important that you think about who wrote these accounts, and who would be most likely to have read them. Find out when these sources were written and think about the social and political context. How far do you think did written fathers, wives, mothers, children, slaves and masters resemble or provide role models for real Romans? What can we infer about Roman women's (or slaves') lives from non-literary sources (e.g. from legal texts, from material evidence)?

       

      Related essay questions:

      ·         What truth, if any, lies behind the ideal of the Roman wife and mother presented in our sources?

      ·         What limits were there, if any, to the control of the paterfamilias over his household? 

      ·         How characteristic of Roman society was the attitude to slaves ascribed to Cato?

    2. Introductory Reading 5 items
      1. The Cambridge companion to the Roman Republic - Harriet I. Flower 2004

        Book  Available in the Library and as an e-book. Articles by Hölkeshamp and Culham.

      2. Roman women - Eve D'Ambra 2007

        Book 

      3. Women in Roman law and society - Gardner, Jane F. 1986

        Book  Available in the Library and as an e-book.

      4. Slavery in the Roman world - Sandra R. Joshel 2010

        Book 

      5. A companion to the Roman Republic - Nathan Stewart Rosenstein, Robert Morstein-Marx 2006

        Book  Available in the Library and as an e-book. Articles by Morley and Rawson.

    3. Further Reading 18 items
      1. Useful Collections 4 items
        1. Women in ancient societies: an illusion of the night - Léonie J. Archer, Susan Fischler, Maria Wyke 1994

          Book 

        2. Images of women in antiquity - Averil Cameron, Amélie Kuhrt 1983

          Book 

        3. The Roman household: a sourcebook - Jane F. Gardner, Thomas E. J. Wiedemann 1991

          Book 

        4. Greek and Roman slavery - Thomas E. J. Wiedemann 1981

          Book 

      2. Portrayals of Women in Latin Literature and Art 4 items
        1. The politics of immorality in ancient Rome - Catharine Edwards 1993

          Book  Read chapter 1

        2. Women in the classical world: image and text - Fantham, Elaine 1994

          Book  Available in the Library and as an e-book.

        3. The Roman mistress: ancient and modern representations - Wyke, Maria 2002

          Book  Available in the Library and as an e-book.

      3. Legal and Social Status of Women 4 items
        1. A history of women in the West: Vol. 1: From ancient goddesses to Christian saints - Georges Duby, Michelle Perrot, Pauline Schmitt Pantel, (trans.) Arthur Goldhammer 1992

          Book 

        2. Roman marriage: Iusti Coniuges from the time of Cicero to the time of Ulpian - Treggiari, Susan 1991

          Book  Available in the Library and as an e-book.

      4. Slaves and Freedmen 6 items
        1. Slavery and society at Rome - K. R. Bradley 1994

          Book 

        2. Slavery and the Roman literary imagination - William Fitzgerald 2000

          Book  Chapters 2 and 4.

        3. Conquerors and slaves - Hopkins, Keith 1978

          Book  Chapters 1 and 2. Available in the Library and as an e-book.

        4. The freedman in the Roman world - Henrik Mouritsen 2011

          Book  Available in the Library and as an e-book.

  3. Week 3: Warfare and Society 17 items
    1. First, read the sources in the Source Booklet. Think about the reasons for Roman success in war. How well did frequent warfare cohere with the social and religious systems in Rome? What strains, if any, did it place on society. How important was military success for the political elite at Rome? What was the involvement of other members of society. You should also understand how the Roman army worked, what a legion was, the basics of tactics and military organisation, and how the army camped.

       

      Related essay questions:

      ·         'Republican Rome is the perfect example of a society geared for conquest.'  Is this true?

      ·         To what extent, and in what ways, was the Roman army able to adapt and improve in response to successes and failures? 

      ·         'Roman reactions to the possibility of a threat resembled those of a nervous tiger, disturbed when feeding' (Peter Brunt).  How accurate is this characterisation of Roman responses to other powers?

    2. Introductory Reading 5 items
      1. War and imperialism in Republican Rome, 327-70 B.C. - Harris, William V. 1985

        Book  Available in the Library or as an e-book.

      2. Conquerors and slaves - Keith Hopkins 1978

        Book  Available in the Library and as an e-book. Read pp.25-37.

      3. A companion to the Roman Republic - Nathan Stewart Rosenstein, Robert Morstein-Marx 2006

        Book  Chapters 7, 13, 26.

      4. The Cambridge companion to the Roman Republic - Harriet I. Flower 2004

        Book  Available in the Library and as an e-book. Chapters 3, 11-14.

    3. Further Reading 11 items
      1. The Roman Army 5 items
        1. Roman military equipment from the the Punic wars to the fall of Rome - M. C. Bishop, J. C. Coulston 2006

          Book  Chapter 4.

        2. Italian manpower, 225 B.C.-A.D. 14 - Brunt, Peter Astbury 1971

          Book  Available in the Library or as an e-book.

        3. Greece and Rome at war - Peter Connolly 1998

          Book 

        4. The Roman army at war: 100 BC-AD 200 - Adrian Keith Goldsworthy 1996

          Book 

        5. The making of the Roman army: from Republic to Empire - L. J. F. Keppie 1994

          Book  Read pp. 14-56.

      2. Roman Militarism 4 items
        1. The Roman triumph - Mary Beard 2007

          Book  Browse selectively.

        2. War and society in the Roman world - Rich, John, Shipley, Graham 1993

          Book  Especially papers by Oakley, Rich and Patterson. Available in the Library and as an e-book.

      3. Specific Wars/Theatres 2 items
        1. The Second Punic War: a reappraisal - Tim Cornell, N. B. Rankov, Philip A. G. Sabin 1996

          Book 

  4. Week 5: Religion 22 items
    1.  First, read the sources in the Source Booklet. Try to get some idea of what the religious life of the city was and how it was spread through the year. You should also think about the following issues. How did the religious life of the city relate to other aspects of the city, for instance its politics; its social system; the rhythms of the agricultural and military year? How was the physical space of the city used in religious ceremonies? What impact did the acquisition of an empire have on Roman religion? 

       

      Related essay questions:

      •                     Fixed by tradition or infinitely flexible: which is a better characterization of Roman republican religion?

      •                     To what extent, and in what ways, was Roman religion manipulated for political purposes? 

      •                     To what extent did religion inform a distinctive Roman identity?

    2. Sources 1 item
      In addition to the sources in the Source Booklet, you may also like to look at this chapter:
      1. Festivals and Ceremonies - Mary Beard, John A. North, S. R. F. Price

        Chapter 

    3. Introductory Reading 6 items
      1. Rome in the late Republic: problems and interpretations - Mary Beard, Michael Crawford 1985

        Book  Chapter 3.

      2. Imperial triumph and religious change - Mary Beard, John A. North, S. R. F. Price

        Chapter 

      3. The Cambridge companion to the Roman Republic - Harriet I. Flower 2004

        Book  Available in the Library and as an e-book. Chapter 10.

      4. A companion to the Roman Republic - Nathan Stewart Rosenstein, Robert Morstein-Marx 2006

        Book  Chapter 10.

      5. Roman religion - Clifford Ando 2003

        Book  Especially Chapters 3, 6, 9, 10. Available in the Library and as an e-book.

      6. An introduction to Roman religion - John Scheid, Janet Lloyd 2003

        Book 

    4. Further Reading 14 items
      1. Change 5 items
        1. Religion in archaic and republican Rome and Italy: evidence and experience - Edward Bispham, Christopher John Smith 2000

          Book  Chapters 5, 7,and 9.

        2. Continuity and change in Roman religion - Liebeschuetz, J. H. W. G. 1979

          Book  Available in the Library and as an e-book.

        3. A companion to Roman religion - Jörg Rüpke 2007

          Book  Part I.

      2. Priests and Politics 3 items
        1. Pagan priests - Mary Beard, John North 1989

          Book  Chapters 1, 2 and 7.

        2. A companion to Roman religion - Jörg Rüpke 2007

          Book  Part IV.

      3. Temples 6 items
        1. Roman public buildings - Ian Maxwell Barton 1995

          Book  Chapters 2 and 3.

        2. Ancient Rome: the archaeology of the eternal city - J. C. Coulston, Hazel Dodge 2000

          Book  Chapters 3 and 11.

        3. A companion to Roman religion - Jörg Rüpke 2007

          Book  Chapters 15-16.

  5. Week 7: The Archaeology of the City of Rome 16 items
    1. Look at the illustrations and other material on MMS at the PowerPoints used in the lectures, and in the suggested web sites linked from the module site.

      This week's discussion builds on the lectures given in week 6 and the essays provide a chance to write on an explicitly archaeological topic, or on a topic that combines archaeology and historical sources. Before the tutorial you should acquire a good knowledge of the topography of the city so you could point out the forum, the Capitol, the Palatine, the Aventine and the Campus Martius on a plan. You should also get some sense of what went on in each quarter of the city, and how it changed over time (and why). Look up the main monuments, think about their locations and functions, who built them and why, and how the politics of the City, and the lives of its inhabitants shaped, and was shaped by, the physical structures of the City.

       

      Related essay questions:

      •                     How did the public buildings of Rome reflect her conquests?

      •                     How far did the physical conditions in which EITHER Rome's urban poor OR the       Roman elite lived change during the Republican period? 

      •                     How far did Augustus in fact rebuild Rome?  Why did he do so?

    2. Introductory Reading 3 items
      1. Ancient Rome: the archaeology of the eternal city - J. C. Coulston, Hazel Dodge 2000

        Book 

      2. The ancient Roman city - John E. Stambaugh 1988

        Book 

      3. A companion to the Roman Republic - Nathan Stewart Rosenstein, Robert Morstein-Marx 2006

        Book  Chapter 4.

    3. Further Reading 12 items
      1. Specific Areas 3 items
        1. The Roman triumph - Mary Beard 2007

          Book  Browse selectively.

        2. Rome and environs: an archaeological guide - Filippo Coarelli, James Joseph (trans.) Clauss, Daniel P. (trans.) Harmon 2007

          Book  Available in the Library and as an e-book.

      2. Social and Economic Problems 4 items
        1. The City of Rome and the Plebs urbana in the late Republic - N. Purcell

          Chapter  Available in the Library and as an e-book.

        2. Roman Mob - P. Brunt

          Chapter 

        3. Famine and food supply in the Graeco-Roman world: responses to risk and crisis - Garnsey, Peter 1988

          Book  Chapters 12 and 13. Available in the Library and as an e-book.

      3. Augustus and Rome 5 items
        1. Rome and its development under Augustus and his successors - Nicholas Purcell

          Chapter  Available in the library and as an e-book.

        2. Augustan Rome - Andrew Wallace-Hadrill 1993

          Book 

        3. The power of images in the Age of Augustus - Paul Zanker, Alan Shapiro 1988

          Book 

        4. The Cambridge companion to the Age of Augustus - Gotthard Karl Galinsky 2005

          Book  Chapter 10. Available in the Library and as an e-book.

  6. Week 9: Politics in the Age of Cicero 27 items
    1. First, read the sources in the Source Booklet. Begin by getting a sense of Cicero's career from his entry into post-Sullan politics, through his rise to prominence in the seventies and sixties, culminating in his consulship in 63 BC, and then on through exile, the first triumvirate, the civil war between Pompey and Caesar, the latter's dictatorship and the quarrel with Antony that led to his death (OCD again). Try to pick out a few key dates and to get a sense of when his career was going well and when badly. What made the difference?

       

      Related essay questions:

      ·         'For the 'newness' of your name you will best compensate by the brilliance of your oratory' (Quintus Cicero).  How far could rhetorical skills, in fact, make up for the disadvantages of being a novus homo in Rome?

      ·         Is there any sense in which Rome can meaningfully be described as a democracy? 

      ·         Were the leaders of the last generation of the Roman republic defending or subverting the Roman constitution? 

    2. Introductory Reading 5 items
      1. Political life in the city of Rome - John R. Patterson 2000

        Book 

      2. The fall of the Roman Republic - D. C. A. Shotter 1994

        Book  Available in the Library and as an e-book.

      3. The Cambridge companion to the Roman Republic - Harriet I. Flower 2004

        Book  Available in the Library and as an e-book. Chapter 2.

      4. A companion to the Roman Republic - Nathan Stewart Rosenstein, Robert Morstein-Marx 2006

        Book  Part V, especially Chapter 20.

    3. Further Reading 21 items
      1. The fall of the Roman Republic: and related essays - P. A. Brunt 1988

        Book  Chapters 7, 8, and 9.

      2. The People 3 items
        1. `Plebs' and politics in the late Roman Republic - Henrik Mouritsen 2001

          Book  Available in the Library and as an e-book.

        2. The world of the citizen in Republican Rome - Claude Nicolet, P. S. Falla 1980

          Book 

      3. Cicero 8 items
        1. Cicero, rhetoric, and empire - C. E. W. Steel 2001

          Book  Available in the Library and as an e-book.

        2. The Cambridge companion to Cicero - Catherine Steel 2013 (electronic book)

          Book  Chapters 8, 9 and 13.

        3. Cicero: a portrait - Elizabeth Rawson 1983

          Book  Read pp. 60-89; 106-121.

        4. Or:

        5. Cicero: a political biography - D. L. Stockton 1971

          Book  Read pp. 110-142; 176-193.

        6. Or:

        7. Cicero and the end of the Roman Republic - Thomas E. J. Wiedemann 1994

          Book 

      4. Julius Caesar 5 items
        1. Caesar - Christian Meier, David McLintock 1996

          Book 

        2. Caesar: politician and statesman - Matthias Gelzer 1968

          Book 

        3. Caesar: the life of a colossus - Adrian Keith Goldsworthy 2006

          Book 

      5. The Italians 3 items
  7. Week 11: Augustus 15 items
    1. There is a large amount of material on this topic in the Source Booklet. This tutorial, together with the related lectures, should help you form your views on the rise to power and political action of the first Roman emperor.

      Think about the mechanics of his rise and the differences between his success in staying in control and the failure of his rivals and predecessors (Antony, Caesar and Pompey above all). This involves thinking about political and military institutions, his handling of the élites of Rome and the Mediterranean World more widely, his image building and his luck. The nature of Augustus' success throws light on the causes of instability and civil war in the late Republic. If 'Augustus' was the answer, what was the question? You will also have to confront major source problems: Augustus left his fingerprints over all our sources, archaeological, literary and documentary. Is it possible to resurrect non-Augustan and even anti-Augustan views of the period?

       

      NB. There are no coursework essay questions directly related to this tutorial given that the lectures and tutorial take place so late in the semester. There will be opportunities to write essays and do gobbets on Augustus in the examination. 

    2. Introductory Reading 5 items
      1. The age of Augustus - Donald Charles Earl 1980

        Book 

      2. Augustus - A. H. M. Jones 1970

        Book 

      3. Augustus Caesar - D. C. A. Shotter 1991

        Book  Available in the Library and as an e-book.

      4. Augustan Rome - Andrew Wallace-Hadrill 1993

        Book 

      5. The Cambridge companion to the Age of Augustus - Gotthard Karl Galinsky 2005

        Book  Available in the library and as an e-book.

    3. Further Reading 9 items
      1. The Cambridge ancient history: Vol.10: The Augustan Empire, 43 B.C.-A.D. 69 - Alan K. Bowman, Edward Champlin, A. W. Lintott 1996

        Book  This provides excellent essays on all the major aspects of Augustus' rule. Available in the Library and as an e-book.

      2. Useful Collections 2 items
        1. Caesar Augustus: seven aspects - Fergus Millar, Erich Segal 1984

          Book 

        2. Between republic and empire: interpretations of Augustus and his principate - Kurt A. Raaflaub, Mark Toher 1990

          Book  Available in the Library and as an e-book.

      3. Poetry, Art and Politics 3 items
        1. The power of images in the Age of Augustus - Paul Zanker, Alan Shapiro 1988

          Book 

      4. Other Aspects 3 items
        1. The Roman revolution - Ronald Syme 2002

          Book  A classic text. Available in the Library and as an e-book.

        2. Augustan Rome - Andrew Wallace-Hadrill 1993

          Book 

  8. References 47 items
    1. Sources 47 items
      1. Histories 12 items
        1. The histories - Polybius, W. R. Paton, F. W. Walbank, Christian Habicht 2010-2012

          Book  Book 6 is a vital source, but 1-5 provide a good background for the period 264-217. Available in the Library and online.

        2. The rise of the Roman Empire - Ian Scott-Kilvert, F. W. Walbank, Polybius 1979

          Book 

        3. Sallust, the histories: Vol. 1: Books 1-2 - Sallust, Patrick McGushin (trans.) 1992

          Book 

        4. The histories: Vol.2: Books 3-5 - Sallust, Patrick McGushin (trans.) 1994

          Book 

        5. Livy: history of Rome, Vol. 1: Books 1-2 - Livy, B. O. Foster (trans.) 1988

          Book 

        6. Livy: history of Rome, Vol. 2: Books 3-4 - Livy, B. O. Foster (trans.) 1984

          Book 

        7. Livy: history of Rome, Vol. 3: Books 5-7 - Livy, B. O. Foster (trans.) 1984

          Book 

        8. Compendium of Roman history / Velleius Paterculus - Velleius Paterculus, Frederick W. Shipley (trans.) 1924

          Book 

        9. Velleius Paterculus his Romane historie: in two bookes - Janus Gruterus, Robert Le Grys, Velleius Paterculus 1632 (electronic book)

          Book 

        10. Appian's Roman history - Appian, Horace White (trans.) 1912

          Book 

      2. Other texts 9 items
        1. Plutarch's Lives - Plutarch, Arthur Hugh Clough 1910

          Book 

        2. Seven commentaries on the Gallic war - Julius Caesar, Aulus Hirtius, Carolyn (trans.) Hammond 1998

          Book 

        3. The comedies - Terence, Peter Brown (trans.) 2006

          Book 

        4. The complete poems - Gaius Valerius Catullus, Guy Lee (trans.) 2008

          Book 

        5. The Aeneid - Virgil, David West (trans.) 1990

          Book 

        6. The odes - Horace, Kenneth Quinn (trans.) 1996

          Book 

        7. Ovid: 2: The art of love, and other poems - Ovid, J. H. (trans.) Mozley 1979

          Book 

      3. Collection of Sources 6 items
        1. Roman civilization: Sourcebook 1: The Republic - Lewis, Naphtali, Reinhold, Meyer 1966

          Book 

        2. Roman civilization: Sourcebook 2: The Empire - Lewis, Naphtali, Reinhold, Meyer 1966

          Book 

        3. Roman statutes - Crawford, Michael, Cloud, J.D. 1996

          Book 

      4. Reference Works 20 items
        1. The Oxford classical dictionary - Simon Hornblower, Antony Spawforth 2003

          Book  Available in the Library or as an e-book.

        2. The Cambridge ancient history: Vol. 7: Rise of Rome to 220 B.C. - F. W. Walbank 1989

          Book  Available in the library and as an e-book.

        3. The Cambridge ancient history: Vol. 9: Last age of the Roman Republic, 146-43 B.C - J. A. Crook, A. W. Lintott, Elizabeth Rawson 1994

          Book  Available in the library and as an e-book.

        4. The Cambridge ancient history: Vol. 10: Augustan empire, 43 B.C.-A.D. 69 - Alan K. Bowman, Edward Champlin, A. W. Lintott 1996

          Book  Available in the library and as an e-book.

        5. Brill's New Pauly - Hubert Cancil, Helmuth Schneider, Manfred Landfester, Christine F. Salazar (trans.) (electronic bibliographic database)

          Book 

        6. Atlas of classical history - Richard J. A. Talbert 1985

          Book 

        7. Ancient history atlas - Michael Grant, Arthur Banks 1971

          Book 

        8. Atlas of the Roman world - Tim Cornell, John Matthews 1982

          Book 

        9. A history of Rome - Marcel Le Glay, Jean-Louis Voisin, Yann Le Bohec 2005

          Book 

        10. The Roman Republic - Michael Crawford 1992

          Book 

        11. The rise of Rome, to 264 B.C. - Jacques Heurgon, James Willis 1973

          Book 

        12. Early Rome and the Etruscans - R. M. Ogilvie 1976

          Book 

        13. The Etruscans - Massimo Pallottino, David Ridgway, Joseph Cremona 1974

          Book 

        14. A history of earliest Italy - Massimo Pallottino, Kate Soper, Martin H. Ryle 1991

          Book 

        15. Etruscan Italy - Nigel Jonathan Spivey, Simon Stoddart 1990

          Book 

All rights reserved ©